Protect transactions and customer data with an SSL Certificate

Standard SSL

  • Single Domain
  • Issued within minutes
  • 256-bit encryption
  • Padlock icon and https:// prefix
  • Validates domain ownership.
  • $100,000 warranty

$59.95 / per year

Premium SSL

  • Single Domain
  • Extended Validation
  • 256-bit encryption
  • Trusted green address bar
  • Padlock icon and https:// prefix
  • $100,000 warranty

$129.95 / per year

Wildcard SSL

  • Single Domain
  • Unlimited Subdomains
  • Issued within minutes
  • 256-bit encryption
  • Padlock icon and https:// prefix
  • $100,000 warranty

$249.95 / per year

Certificates for
Multiple Domains

Standard SSL UCC

  • Multiple Domains
  • Issued within minutes
  • 256-bit encryption
  • Padlock icon and https:// prefix
  • Validates domain ownership.
  • $100,000 warranty

$99.95 / per year

Premium SSL UCC

  • Multiple Domains
  • Extended Validation
  • 256-bit encryption
  • Trusted green address bar
  • Padlock icon and https:// prefix
  • $1,000,000 warranty

$349.99 / per year

SSL Certificate Questions Answered!

What is an SSL Certificate?

An SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate is what secures data as it is transferred to and from your website in an encrypted format. Encryption is the process of scrambling data into an undecipherable format that can only be returned to a readable format with the proper decryption key.

Essentially, an SSL certificate serves as an electronic “passport” that establishes an online entity’s credentials when transmitting data. When one of your site visitors sends confidential information through your website, the visitor’s browser accesses the server’s digital certificate and establishes a secure connection.

Some Plans Show UCC – What is That?

UCC stands for Unified Communications Certificate and is an SSL that secures multiple domain names as well as multiple host names within a domain name. Note that the information listed in the “Issued To” section of the site seal and certificate will only list the primary domain name. Also know that any secondary hosting accounts will be listed in the certificate as well, so if you do not want sites to appear ‘connected’ to each other, you should not use this type of certificate.

Do I Need a UCC or Wildcard SSL Certificate?

First, you would only need one of these if you need protection beyond your primary domain.  If you plan to only use one domain name (yoursite.com), but want to secure numerous subdomains (shop.yoursite.com; support.yoursite.com; blog.yoursite.com), then a Wildcard SSL certificate will meet your needs.

If you plan to secure multiple domain names, then a UCC SSL may be better for your situation. This would allow you to secure multiple domains (yoursite.com; newsite.com; anothersite.com) as well as subdomains (blog.yoursite.com; shop.newsite.com; support.anothersite.com).

Should I Use an SSL Certificate on my Site?

If you plan to have your site visitor’s transmit sensitive information through your website, then consider it a requirement to have an SSL certificate – this is especially true if you accept credit cards on your website through a merchant account.

You will find that third party payment processors, like PayPal, already have the security in place since the transaction takes place on their servers – but from the customer’s perspective, seeing a security lock on their browser from beginning to end builds their confidence in what you are offering. Even if you plan to only use a basic contact form, it is a good idea to secure your site. It lets your visitors know you value their privacy.

Lastly, search engine placement can be improved when a site is protected with an SSL certificate.

What is a Wildcard SSL Certificate?

Wildcard SSL certificates secures your website domain name and an unlimited number of its subdomains. For example, if we used a Wildcard certificate on our website, we could secure our main domain name www.ewebsitesolutions.com, as well as any number of subdomains: domains.ewebsitesoltions.com, hosting.ewebsitesolutions.com, support.ewebsitesolutions.com.

How Will People Know my Site is Secure?

Regardless of the type of SSL certificate you purchase, the browser bar will display a padlock icon and the https:// prefix in the URL address.

Most users know to look for those indicators, but you could also add a site seal to your website to let visitor’s know you site is verified and secure. When they click on the seal they can see the certificate’s status and details.

If you purchased one of the “Premium” SSL certificate plans, the address bar in their browser will also be displayed in green.